Projects

Project objective

The goal is to develop highly innovative wind farm control (WFC) algorithms that achieve an optimized balance between maximization of the yearly power production, lifetime extension and O&M cost reduction, and guarantee proper operation under realistic temporal and spatial variations of the wind resource. The state-of-the-art is currently represented by a static open-loop approach in which the turbines’ settings (pitch angles and yaw misalignments) are optimized for fixed wind speeds and directions. CL-WINDCON has the ambition to move the current static, open-loop WFC towards dynamic closed-loop control. Dynamic WFC will be capable to take into account the variability of the flow (time and spatial variations in the wind resource), as well as model uncertainties, thereby ensuring optimal performance in real-life environment.

Expected outcome

At the end of the project, the maturity of the WFC algorithms will be increased to the level that they are optimized for operation in a real-life environment. Initial full scale tests will have been performed.

Contributing organizations

  • Aalborg University
  • Dewi-OCC
  • ECN part of TNO
  • Enel
  • General Electric GE GR
  • GH
  • IKERLAN-IK4
  • POLIMI
  • QI ENERGY
  • Ramboll Offshore Wind
  • Delft University of Technology
  • TUM
  • University of Stuttgart

 

Project objective

The Supergen Hub takes a leadership role in bringing together the underpinning research efforts in Wind Energy in the UK and linking them more strongly to the development research being supported by other funding organisations. The aim of the Hub is to continue to develop the important academic, industrial and policy linkages that were established during the earlier phases of the SUPERGEN Wind programme (2006-2014), and to lead the technology strategy for driving forward UK wind energy research and for exploiting the research outcomes.

Expected outcome

The Supergen Wind Hub brings together leading wind energy academic research groups in UK to address the medium term challenges of scaling up to multiple wind farms, considering how to better build, operate and maintain multi-GW arrays of wind turbines whilst providing a reliable source of electricity whose characteristics can be effectively integrated into a modern power system such as that in the UK. The wind resource over both short and long terms, the interaction of wakes within a wind farm and the turbine loads and their impact on reliability will all need to be better understood. The layout of the farms, including foundations, impact on radar and power systems and shore-connection issues, will need to be optimised. The most effective and efficient operation of wind farms will require them to act as virtual conventional power plants flexibly responding to the current conditions, the wind turbines’ state and operational demands and grid-integration requirements. The programme of research for the Supergen Wind Energy Hub will focus on all of the above, both at the level of single farms and of clusters of farms.

Contributing organizations

  • University of Bristol
  • Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult
  • Cranfield University
  • DNV GL
  • University of Dundee
  • Durham University
  • Imperial College London
  • Loughborough University
  • Science and Technology Facilities Council
  • University of Surrey
  • University of Strathclyde
  • University of Manchester